Sector and AuSAE News

  • 14 Jul 2014 1:04 PM | Louise Stokes

    Not for Profits, the Royal Flying Doctor Service Victoria and Rural Health Workforce Australia, have announced the four recipients of its Give Them Wings scholarships. This is the third year the organisations have run the scholarship program, designed to encourage the next generation of nursing and allied health professionals from rural communities. Each scholarship is worth $2,500 and also offers Royal Flying Doctor experience.


    The 2014 Give Them Wings scholars are:
    • Rhiannan Frusher, from Warrnambool, a nursing student at Deakin University’s Warrnambool campus;
    • Kurt Murphy, from Welshmans Reef, a physiotherapy student at La Trobe University’s Bendigo campus;
    • Natalie Dowling, from Yarrawonga, an optometry student at Deakin University in Geelong;
    • Tasmin Lewis, from Drouin East, an occupational therapy student at Monash University’s Peninsula campus.
    RFDS Victoria Chief Executive Scott Chapman said it was important to encourage young health professionals to consider living and working in country areas. “The Flying Doctors understand how crucial it is for rural communities to have access to quality medical services,” he said. Rural Health Workforce Australia CEO Greg Mundy said the scholarship recipients were fine role models for other country students interested in health careers. Rural Health Workforce Australia said The Give Them Wings scholarship program was generously supported by the volunteer fundraising activities of the Bayside Auxiliary of the Royal Flying Doctor Service Victoria.

    Sourced directly from: http://www.probonoaustralia.com.au/news/2014/07/rural-health-nfp-scholarship-winners-announced

  • 14 Jul 2014 9:30 AM | Louise Stokes

    A grant of $50,000 is on offer for a Queensland charity that provides social welfare support to people who are most disadvantaged.


    The grant is part of the inaugural Women & Change grant round for 2014. Women & Change is a Giving Circle initiated by a group of Brisbane women in late 2013, who say they are “passionate about helping people and causes in the greatest need”.


    According to the group, each year, Women & Change will call for applications in July with one grant awarded in November, according to a staged application and assessment process, with the final decision being made by vote of Women & Change members.    


    “Preference will be given to applicants whose projects will produce positive social outcomes to Queenslanders living in disadvantage; are well defined, and; include a clear community need, strategies, budget, project outcomes and details of how you will evaluate your project’s successful implementation and outcomes,” Women & Change said.


    Expressions of Interest close at 5pm on August 1 with short-listed applicants invited to submit a full proposal by September 26, 2014.


    To download the grant guidelines, click here. For more information email, grants@womenandchange.com.au


    All applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by August 29.


    - See more at: http://www.probonoaustralia.com.au/news/2014/07/giving-circle-opens-50k-welfare-grant#sthash.GgnOzcRf.dpuf

    A grant of $50,000 is on offer for a Queensland charity that provides social welfare support to people who are most disadvantaged.

    The grant is part of the inaugural Women & Change grant round for 2014. Women & Change is a Giving Circle initiated by a group of Brisbane women in late 2013, who say they are “passionate about helping people and causes in the greatest need”.

    According to the group, each year, Women & Change will call for applications in July with one grant awarded in November, according to a staged application and assessment process, with the final decision being made by vote of Women & Change members.    

    “Preference will be given to applicants whose projects will produce positive social outcomes to Queenslanders living in disadvantage; are well defined, and; include a clear community need, strategies, budget, project outcomes and details of how you will evaluate your project’s successful implementation and outcomes,” Women & Change said.

    Expressions of Interest close at 5pm on August 1 with short-listed applicants invited to submit a full proposal by September 26, 2014.

    To download the grant guidelines, click here. For more information email, grants@womenandchange.com.au

    All applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by August 29.

    - See more at: http://www.probonoaustralia.com.au/news/2014/07/giving-circle-opens-50k-welfare-grant#sthash.GgnOzcRf.dpuf
  • 11 Jul 2014 10:41 AM | Louise Stokes

    Directly sourced from: http://www.knowledgedirectweb.com/bridging-skills-gap-an-opportunity-for-associations/

    There’s a huge skills gap problem facing our nation today, but this crisis represents an opportunity for associations to reinvent themselves and compete with traditional suppliers of higher education.

    I was recently asked to present on the skills gap issue and the opportunities it creates for associations at the ASAE Great Ideas conference in Orlando.  There are many facets to the problem. First, while a majority (56%) of the overall labor force is 44 or younger, 53% of allskill-trade jobs are held by older workers.  And as these workers are retiring, the younger generation is not ready to fill these skill-trade positions.

    College may not be the answer. While college graduation rates are at an all-time high, a college degree alone may not be the solution.  In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that two-thirds of the 30 fastest growing occupations through 2022 will not even required postsecondary education for entry. So even as this next generation is graduating with record high financial aid debt, they still lack the skills needed to get a job. 

    Skills gap isn’t a “someday” problem. Already, according to the “2013 Talent Shortage Survey” by the Manpower Group, 39% of employers report hiring challenges caused by talent shortages.

    How do these problems represent an opportunity for associations? Digitec has been talking about our vision for the ”Association.edu.”  What’s that mean? In this post, I wanted to paint the picture for how associations can help close the skills gap and how it can lead to a revival of the association. With association membership declining in many industries, it’s time to leverage the value of associations to answer the educational needs of members.

    Association.edu

    Private institutions recognize the opportunities that skill gaps offers.  While traditional colleges have been unable to provide some of the technical trade type training that industry is asking for, these for-profit institutions have been popping up like weeds to provide programs. Yet, these institutions are often diploma mills, turning out graduates who emerge with financial aid debt and low job placement rates.  It’s not difficult to understand why. These institutions may not have the qualified staff to provide the right instruction. They lack the industry knowledge, the real-world content and the networking opportunities that lead to jobs.

    The concept behind the Association.edu is to launch online association universities, with course offerings that results in certifications and actual jobs their industries need.  By leveraging association volunteers working in the industry, the association can provide expertise, the content and the connections. This model could harken back to the successful apprentice, journeyman, and master style of learning that is so needed in professional development today.

    How to…

    Building an association university is a long-term vision, certainly not an endeavor that will manifest overnight.

    I’d recommend surveying your existing membership to identify the most critical skills gaps. Then assemble a committee to create specific learning outcomes to answer those needs:

    • What would the graduate need to be able to know or do as a result of the learning experience?
    • How will you measure acquiring these skills? Portfolio? Examination? Practical observation?
    • Where does the content reside to create this course?
    • Who are the Subject Matter Experts within your association?

    In our experience, it’s best to go for a quick homerun. Rather than design an entire curriculum, start with a more scaled down certificate program that you know is critical to your members. Then, work with an instructional designer who can help pull the pieces together, designing and creating the courses, assessment tools and evaluation measures. Then present the results to your board. Once they see these successes, they’ll be more likely to buy into the vision.

    The shifts happening in industry today are causing great disruption. Some associations are seeing this disruption as a real problem for a consistent membership-based model that has served them well for many years. But it’s time associations recognize that change is inevitable. It’s time to recognize these challenges as the opportunities they represent for a rebirth in associations. If associations can respond, this disruption could be good for the industries they serve, good for this lost generation of the un- and under-employed, and good for the economy as a whole.

  • 11 Jul 2014 9:21 AM | Louise Stokes

    Published: 8:12AM Saturday July 12, 2014 Source: ONE News

    Renowned British scientist Professor Robert Winston will deliver a keynote address to an early childhood education conference in Auckland today.

    His talk to the New Zealand Childcare Association's conference is entitled "How do humans learn?".

    The association's chief executive, Nancy Bell says delegates are looking forward to hearing the science behind how children learn using all their senses, and new emerging evidence around the role of epigenetics in learning.

    Following his address this afternoon, Professor Winston will engage less formally with delegates in a discussion expanding on his speech.

    Professor Winston is a medical doctor, scientist, politician and well known television presenter.

    More than 300 people from the Early Childhood Education sector are attending the conference which has the theme: Every child - strong in identity, learning and succeeding.

    The New Zealand Childcare Association represents around 600 early childhood education services, providing education and care to thousands of infants, toddlers and young children.


    Sourced directly from: http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/professor-robert-winston-address-nz-early-childhood-conference-6025580


  • 10 Jul 2014 10:47 AM | Louise Stokes


    Sourced directly from: http://markjgolden.com/2012/03/28/bringing-the-next-generation-into-governance/

    When I ask association leaders (both volunteers and staff professionals) what their biggest long-term governance challenge is, the most frequent answer I hear back is the challenge of bringing the next generation of leaders on board.

    “Young people don’t volunteer the way we used to.”

    “They don’t have the time to devote to volunteering that we did.”

    “Their needs and expectations are different than ours were when we came up through the ranks.”

    Each of those statements is probably true enough, although every one of them would do better for some deeper inquiry. When discussing generational issues, oversimplifications and broad generalizations  appear to be the norm, and can do more damage than good.

    But the underlying concern of current leaders about future leaders is real, serious and important:“Who will come after us and ensure the association continues to fulfill its mission?”

    And, “How can we engage the younger generation, particularly in the area of governance?”

    Serious, selfless and leaderly intentions.  I don’t for a moment doubt the sincerity.


    But as I listen to the discussion that follows, there is one question that persistently occurs to me:  exactly who or what are we trying to reform?

    When current boards discuss this issue, do we actually focus on changing the governance system and culture to make them more likely to interest, engage, excite and be rewarding for the next generation of leaders?

    More often, it seems to me, what actually happens is the established board, made up of more seasoned and experienced individuals,  is looking for ways to get the next generation to change, not the system.  They struggle to find ways to make the youngsters  more fully understand and appreciate the current governance system just the way it is.  In short, it’s all about trying to make the next generation leader more like we are ourselves, so that they will want to step into the leadership system and culture just as they are.Are we trying to remake the next generation of leaders in our own image or are we trying to establish a governance model that will be sustainable and serve the membership into the future?  

    Are we willing to design a governance  model and culture to suit the needs and preferences of the next generation, even if the result is a system we would find uncomfortable ourselves?

     

  • 10 Jul 2014 9:24 AM | Louise Stokes

    From mid- August Tourism New Zealand will be visiting Auckland, Queenstown, Christchurch, Dunedin, Wellington and Rotorua for a series of free industry updates, focussing on our work in the priority emerging markets of India, Indonesia and Latin America.


    The five hour afternoon workshop will include presentations from Justin Watson, Director of Trade, PR and Major Events, and each of the priority emerging markets' country manager. You will also have the opportunity to learn some valuable tools and gain insight into building relationships and contacts in these markets.

    Sessions will be held on the following dates. You can register for any of the sessions here.
    • Auckland - Friday, 15 August 2014
    • Queenstown - Monday, 18 August 2014
    • Christchurch - Tuesday, 19 August 2014
    • Dunedin - Wednesday, 20 August 2014
    • Wellington - Thursday, 21 August 2014
    • Rotorua - Friday, 22 August 2014
    The event will finish with an hour of drinks and nibbles.
  • 10 Jul 2014 9:19 AM | Louise Stokes
    Monday, 7 July 2014, 2:14 pm


    Experienced property investor Andrew Bruce is the new President of the Auckland Property Investors’ Association (APIA).

    Having been a member of APIA for over 10 years, Bruce was elected to the Association’s board in 2008 and served as Vice-President between 2010 and 2014. In his place, the Board has appointed Peter Lewis as its Vice-President.

    “Property has proven time and time again to be a solid investment vehicle,” said Bruce. “With the right knowledge and motivation to act, I believe we can all make intelligent decisions today to be better off financially tomorrow. I see APIA playing a pivotal role in the community as the disseminator of independent and sound information as well as providing investors with the necessary support and industry representation throughout their investment journeys.”

    Bruce looks forward to working with Lewis and the rest of the Board to further the APIA’s resource base, advocating for members’ interests as well as marketing the Association’s benefits to Auckland investors.

    ENDS


  • 03 Jul 2014 1:45 PM | Louise Stokes


    The Australian Human Resources Institute (AHRI) is the latest brand to become a digital publisher, launching Human Resources Media in partnership with content marketing agency Mahlab Media.

    The Human Resources Media platform includes the content hub www.hrmonline.com.au, weekly enewsletters, fortnightly video, social media channels and a revamped print publication, HRMonthly magazine.


    The launch of the new media brand is part of a strategy that will see AHRI cater for the wider HR profession as well as its membership.

    Mahlab Media designed the website in partnership with AHRI and is producing daily news updates, practical articles and exclusive interviews, insights and commentary from HR thought leaders.

    A feature of HRM online is that readers can use their LinkedIn profiles to have conversations with their peers directly on the content hub, shifting relevant and topical discussions into a more intimate setting. AHRI’s LinkedIn community includes more than 40,000 HR professionals and people managers and leverages the fast growing influence of LinkedIn within the profession.

    Bobbi Mahlab, Managing Director and founder of Mahlab Media, says: “The strategy we developed and are implementing for Human Resources Media supports AHRI in its shift towards becoming a digital publisher in its own right. This is a trend that is happening globally as brands from Coca Cola to ANZ develop their own content and media assets.”

    AHRI CEO Lyn Goodear says: “Our ambition for the site is for it to become the number one destination for HR practitioners looking for online information and professional insights. We want our members to access relevant and up to the minute content on their smartphones, tablets and computers 24 hours a day. We also want it to provide a commercial platform for suppliers to reach our profession.”
  • 03 Jul 2014 1:39 PM | Louise Stokes

    It is difficult to undertake in-depth planning at Board meetings, where short-term matters and performance monitoring often dominate the agenda, and your Board may choose to set aside a day or two each year for strategic planning. The decision about conducting an annual planning workshop or retreat usually requires the CEO to undertake the difficult job of choosing a professional facilitator for the day. The Board expects the CEO to find a facilitator that is appropriate for the organisation, has a broad understanding of the sector, and will be able to work with the unique characteristics of the Board. A facilitator can completely change the dynamic and outcome of the workshop, and choosing a poor facilitator will ultimately reflect poorly on the CEO.

    These tips can help guide your thinking around finding the right facilitator for your organisation and ultimately getting the most out of your planning workshop.

    Set Clear Outcomes
    Before locating potential facilitators, consider the intended outcome of the workshop. Think about what the Board will have at the end of the day that it didn't have at the beginning of the day. This is important because often the discussion can move into the specifics before the outcome is determined – discussions around venue and guest speakers are often had before the intended outcome is determined. The end should determine the means, and a planning day is a means to an end. Importantly, the intended outcome is the best criteria for selecting the best facilitator. Facilitators can and do vary a great deal in style, experience and expertise the facilitator that you select should be ‘fit for purpose’.

    Once the outcome of the day is determined, you can consider how that will be achieved. Whilst it can be tempting to fill the day with guest speakers and PowerPoint presentations, this should be avoided – it disrupts the flow of discussion and prevents the Board from digging deeper, which is the very reason the Board has set aside a full day. Too may presentations and speakers results in Board members becoming a passive audience and it also turns your facilitator into an MC – a very expensive one. If a guest speaker is required try not to schedule them in the very first session, place them before a morning tea or lunch break. Ensure the guest speaker is ‘thought provoking’ rather than presenting data or information – this can be included in the pre-reading for the workshop.

    A facilitator should always meet with the CEO and preferably the Chairperson at least 14 days before the workshop. This discussion should be one in which the facilitator listens, rather than dominating the discussion by speaking about themselves or their ideas for the session: What are the current issues? What decisions have already been made? What are the intended outcomes?

    After this meeting ask the facilitator to provide a draft running sheet with session content, timing and most importantly the expected outcomes from each session. A good facilitator should provide a running sheet that ensures that all activities and discussions are moving toward the intended outcome in a logical and robust process. Ask to see this draft and have a further discussion to help clarify whether the design of the day is going to give you what you want.

    Shop Around
    Put effort into locating a number of possible candidates to facilitate the workshop. A simple Google search will turn up many results, particularly using terms like nfp facilitator or nfp strategic planning along with the name of the city you’re based in.

    Importantly, ask for referrals from other CEOs in your network. This way you can be assured that the facilitator was effective and personable, as well as possibly save a bit of time in your search.

    It is completely reasonable to ask the facilitator for a ‘ball park’ figure on how much one can expect to pay for a full day of facilitation. Always specify whether your workshop will be held on a weekday or a weekend, how many people will be attending, and where it will be held, as these two factors can have a significant impact on the cost. It takes a great deal longer to prepare for a large group of more than fifteen people than a Board-only session that is generally up to twelve people.

    Avoid Using a Template
    It’s preferable to avoid planning to a ‘template’ – the best model to use in planning is one that’s been customised to your Board, your organisation and its context. This is particularly important if the organisation is undergoing a significant change in direction or is facing new challenges such as system reform or a new government funding landscape.

    However, a template model may be appropriate if the Board wants revisit the fundamentals of strategic planning. A facilitator that specialises in basic planning architecture will be the most appropriate and these facilitators should have a lower cost because they work from a standard format.

    Check References
    If you are engaging a new facilitator for the first time, ask for references and call them. If the Board is unhappy with the facilitator, it is going to be a very long and drawn-out day and an investment of time and funds that is not going to give you the result that you want.

    Ask any proposed facilitator if they regularly seek feedback on their performance and if you can have copies of this feedback. Good facilitators should be able to provide you with the results of previous evaluations and will be more than happy to provide references to organisations that they have worked with before.

    When following up with references, some important questions to ask can include:

    • Was the style of the facilitator appropriate? Did the facilitator conduct the session respectfully and did they appear to have a level of knowledge about the organisation and the sector?
    • Was the session designed well and was there enough time to discuss the important issues? Did the sessions keep to time? Did the facilitator allow conversations to reach their natural conclusion before moving on?
    • Did the session produce what was intended? Was it a valuable use of your time and money?
    Pay a Fair Price
    Many facilitators will have different ways of determining their fee for a workshop – some will charge by the hour, some by the day, and others on a whole-of-project basis. In order to get an accurate comparison between facilitators, it’s important that you’re clear on what you expect from their quote – ask facilitators to include their preparation costs and travel time, and make it clear whether you would like the facilitator to provide workshop notes or a written report.

    It can be difficult to determine what the appropriate amount of money is for a high quality facilitator. It’s important to remember that whilst spending thousands of dollars on a single day’s facilitation will seem like a lot of money, a good facilitator will also spend time before the workshop preparing for the day, including by meeting with both the CEO and the Chair, as well as conducting background research into the organisation and the sector it operates in. Additionally, the facilitator should prepare a custom running sheet and agenda in order to achieve the outcomes you have set for the day.

    As a general guide, a full day workshop can require three to four days’ worth of preparation, though obviously less time is required if the facilitator has worked with your organisation previously. As an indicative range, an organisation should expect to pay around $3,000-$4,000 for a full-day workshop held on a Saturday. This amount should include preparatory meetings, assembly of a running sheet and agenda, and provision of pre-reading if required.

    Some facilitators will also offer to provide written workshop notes. This can enable the CEO to participate fully in the session, rather than taking notes or struggling to translate mass of butchers’ paper in the week following. Ideally, the facilitator would be accompanied by a second person in order to take comprehensive notes. Following the workshop, these notes can be formed into a strategic workshop, not only outlining what was discussed but also including key strategic recommendations for the Board. If a workshop report is required that can take an additional two days, possibly adding $1,000-$2,000 to the cost.

    Always ask if there is a discount for charities and not-for-profit organisations. Many facilitators and consultants will take this into consideration when preparing their quote, especially if working with a small organisation with a turnover of under $1 million.

    Ask About The Process
    After you have selected a briefed the preferred facilitation, ensure that there is a good process for designing the format of the day. A facilitator should always meet with the CEO and preferably the Chairperson at least 14 days before the workshop. This discussion should be one in which the facilitator listens, rather than dominating the discussion by speaking about themselves or their ideas for the session: What are the current issues? What decisions have already been made? What are the intended outcomes?

    After this meeting ask the facilitator to provide a draft running sheet with session content, timing and most importantly the expected outcomes from each session. A good facilitator should provide a running sheet that ensures that all activities and discussions are moving toward the intended outcome in a logical and robust process. Ask to see this draft and have a further discussion to help clarify whether the design of the day is going to give you what you want.

    The decision to set aside a full day to plan is an important investment in the future of any organisation. To gain the full benefits of this day, you should invest the right amount of time and effort in selecting, briefing and managing a high quality facilitator.
    Spending money on a high quality facilitator is an important investment, as your planning day can be much more productive.

    About the Author: Lesley Yates is the Managing Partner of the Radno Group (www.radno.com.au). With academic qualifications in education, economics and public relations, Lesley has worked extensively across the public and private sectors, as well as having held a number of governance and leadership positions on government and not-for-profit Boards.

  • 02 Jul 2014 3:42 PM | Louise Stokes
    It is my great pleasure to announce registrations are now open for the 2014 Annual AuSAE Leadership Symposium in Sydney, Australia.

    Under the theme “Game On: Leadership in Motion”, AuSAE’s 2014 Leadership Symposium brings together knowledgeable executives and practitioners from across Australasia and addresses a wide range of topics focusing on membership, leadership, advocacy and management. Attending is also a great opportunity to meet and collaborate with new colleagues from across the country who share your interests, concerns, and on-the-job challenges. Throughout the two day event, you will have unparalleled access to networking opportunities with fellow delegates. Attendees can make the most of this educational and networking opportunity at the Conversations Corner – AuSAE’s own private café setting. We will also be celebrating AuSAE’s 60th Anniversary at the Symposium Gala Dinner.


    Click here to visit the Symposium webpage and view a sneak peak of the 2014 program


    If you are interested, there are a few panel session vacancies for not-for-profits wishing to share their knowledge on the topics of “Future Trends for Events”, “Choosing Membership Software” and “Why HR Matters: Employing for the future”. For more information please email kimberley@ausae.org.au


    I very much look forward to seeing you in Sydney this October 13-14.


    Warm Regards,
    Tony Steven
    AuSAE President





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