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  • 22 Nov 2017 10:55 AM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    Mergers amongst existing federated organisations[1] with related and like minded national and state based arms is being increasingly viewed as an avenue to better realise the common objectives of otherwise separate legal companies or entities. Competition within federated charities or not-for-profits, especially arms which share the same name, has been cited to be as fierce as that of competition from outside organisations.[2] With most national Australian not-for-profits and charities structured as federations, thousands of these organisations could stand to benefit from the efficiencies of consolidation.[3]

    In particular, the Community Council for Australia and other peak bodies have been calling upon charities to consider merging or closing down in a bid to reduce competition for increasingly limited funding.[4] Inability to secure adequate funding not only stumps capacity to achieve successful outcomes, but threatens the very survival of such organisations.[5]

    Why is consolidation beneficial?

    Consolidation of federated structures through the combining of resources, funds and other specialised infrastructure provides a significant cost and efficiency booster. With particular regard to charities, this offers a creative solution against reduced government investment and fewer bequests and donations in recent years. Large charities, for instance, reported $38.2 million less in donations and bequests in 2015 than 2014, a drop of 2.1%.[6]

    Consolidation of federated structures is also a strategic avenue for realising a collective mission statement that multiple related bodies are struggling to achieve alone. Consolidation results in the reduced duplication of work (noting that approximately 600,000 not-for-profits and 54,000 charities registered with the ACNC currently operate across Australia),[7] lowering of administrative burdens and associated benefits to an organisation’s financial sustainability. For charities, consolidation also works to eliminate competition for fundraising and government contracts. These combined efforts contribute to the deliverance of strengthened services that can reach further in benefiting intended communities or target groups.[8]

    Can large federated organisations continue to justify the significant expense of multiple CEOs, finance, administration, IT, communication, marketing, human resources and fundraising teams that do the same thing?[9] Good people can make federated structures work, but this requires them to work against problems inherent in their structure – why work against a problem when that very problem can be eliminated?[10]

    What are some common misconceptions?

    When consolidation embodies open dialogue between State boards in developing a clear national strategy, is well planned, well managed and tailored to the specific requirements of individual cases – common traps can be avoided. Of particular importance is aligning existing boards, defining roles for senior staff, blending the various brands and managing priority between the strategic directions of national and State based arms[11] in a way that is mutually acceptable.[12]

    Removing separate governance structures, boards and CEOs that operate on a smaller localised level need not diminish the quality of services and community relationships. Consolidation in an effort to better achieve common goals can in fact encourage this as a priority when negotiating cultural and branding differences. Priority can be placed on growing core business outcomes, rather than singular organisations. This encourages potential self-interests and rivalries to be put aside in pursuit of a wider shared goal.[13]

    Moreover, consolidation delivers the opportunity to develop more holistic national strategies rather than limited State based outlooks. It also encourages otherwise State interested players to have greater influence and voice over national issues. This works to combat criticism that hierarchical federated structures deny people at the more local/State level the opportunity to have a direct say in the election of their national leaders or policies.[14]

    Additionally, the increased size of a consolidated national organisation provides better positioning to lobby the government in respect of applicable policy. Other potential benefits include:

    • the ability to exploit links, contacts, skills and knowledge between State arms. This also increases diversity and innovation;
    • greater authority with potential corporate donors or sponsors (who might be more willing to support bigger organisations with a perceived larger reach or benefit); and
    • stronger influence over a relevant industry or community group through the ability to generate more income due to increased size and brand.

    Furthermore, consolidation among federated structures which are already functionally related carries fewer operational risks compared with mergers among completely unrelated organisations where wholesale change can occur.[15] Some level of change in the consolidation process is, however, inevitable. Acceptance of change can be better achieved where it is openly justified, explained with clear reasoning and where procedures for evaluation/monitoring are created. Negotiating acceptable time-frames for individual State arms to transition to new processes can also assist.[16]

    It is important to remember that, while the legal separation of State arms as individual entities is removed by the consolidation process, some functional division can be maintained. This occurs via the grouping of individual State members into chapters, which retains some ability for State arms (and particularly members of professional or industry associations) to manage specific matters, dealings and issues at a State level.

    Is it actually happening?

    According to the YWCA’s National Merger Project website, the YWCA (Young Women’s Christian Association) is currently considering consolidation to create a single, national entity. As at 2017, the YWCA comprises of 11 member associations, each with its own board, constitution, set of programs and media presence (this follows a trend which once saw over 54 separate YWCAs across Australia). These 11 associations (operating across different States and Territories) are members of YWCA Australia which is affiliated with the World YWCA.

    The proposed consolidation, publicised formally as the ‘YWCA National Merger Project’, has been encouraged by the YWCA, as a mechanism to ‘ensure that YWCAs in Australia can continue to efficiently and effectively deliver for current and future members… who rely on their services’. It has also been supported for its ability to increase the organisation’s impact and influence as well as assist in keeping the YWCA current in the changing market place. The YWCA has particularly highlighted the merger as being a response to competitive pressures experienced by the not-for-profit sector in Australia.[17]

    Some operational steps that have occurred in the YWCA merger space are summarised as follows:[18]

    • June 2016: Continuing from 2014 to 2015, YWCA member associations participated in growing conversations about how to improve the movement in Australia. In June 2016, a National Merger Team was established to coordinate the advancement of the ‘National Merger Project’.
    • August 2016: The National Merger Project was developed to address key objectives: federation and transformation; fulfilling our potential; purpose and impact; leadership and expertise; and partnerships and opportunities.
    • 21 November 2016: Representatives from YWCA branches across Australia came together in Melbourne to sign a Statement of Intent, agreeing to explore the option of a national merger.
    • 6 March 2017: A national constitution reached its final stages of development. Some noteworthy elements included the introduction of a Young Women’s Member Council to provide advice and input to the National Board and better use of technology to increase accessibility and participation in the business.
    • 19 April 2017: YWCAs around Australia were presented with a draft business case and possible pathway for legal transition. The 29th to the 30th of April saw the presidents of the Member Associations coming together to finalise the merger proposal and determine the best legal process for creating a new national entity.
    • 15 May 2017: A merger milestone was reached with all exploratory documents being finalised with input from YWCA State/Territory branches. A business case was completed, presenting a positive outlook for a unified national entity. Due diligence was concluded, with no roadblocks to merging arising. The proposed new constitution was finalised.

    Eleven YWCA branches reaffirmed their commitment for a national merger, with a targeted merger set for the end of the 2017 calendar year.

    • 23 July 2017: YWCA branches present at an Adelaide meeting resolved to commence discussions with uninvolved YWCA branches to create pathways for inclusion and collaboration. Preferred legal pathways for merging were identified and feedback commenced with the launch of a staff survey.
    • 10 September 2017: YWCA branches met in Melbourne to continue discussions and preparations for the final stages of the Merger Project. In collaboration with representatives from YWCA branches and expert consultants, a target operating model was finalised as well as recommendations to harmonise transition. Recruitment of a new President, Board and Managing Director to lead the new entity is expected to commence once merger timelines are prepared.

    Correspondence with YWCAs in the Hunter and Canberra has commenced to establish pathways for inclusion and collaboration.

    YWCAs across Australia continue to encourage feedback and engagement with staff and members. A formal merger booklet will be published for members prior to any formal decision to merge.

    For more information, please contact Vera Visevic, Partner, Mills Oakley.

    References

    [1] Neil Primrose, Best Structure for Best Practice NFPs – Federated or Unitary: A Primrose Solution Discussion Paper (February 2009) Primrose Solutions (WordPress) .

    [2] Alexandra Black, ‘Charities body calls for mergers’, The Canberra Times (online) 11 November 2015 .

    [3] Ibid; Primrose, above n 1, 1.

    [4] Black, above n 2; Xavier Smerdon, ‘Merge or Shut Down, Australian Charities Told’, Pro Bono Australia (online) 11 November 2015 ; Judith Ireland, ‘Peak body calls for charities to merge amid funding squeeze’, The Sydney Morning Herald (online) 11 November 2015 .

    [5] Black, above n 2.

    [6] N Cortis, A Young, A Powell, R Reeve, R Simnett, K Ho and I Ramia, Australian Charities Report 2015 (2016) Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission 89.

    [7] Australian Government Productivity Commission, Productivity Commission Research Report: Contribution of the Not-for-profit Sector (January 2010) .

    [8] Black, above n 1; Smerdon, above n 4; Ireland, above n 4.

    [9] Smerdon, above n 4.

    [10] Primrose, above n 1, 1.

    [11] Willa Seldon, ‘If Nonprofit Mergers Seem Obvious, Why Aren’t There More?’, Huffpost (online) 24 February 2014 .

    [12] John Vaughan-Williams, Charitable and Not-for-profit Mergers: Solution or Generalisation? (February 2015) Mills Oakley ; Primrose, above n 1, 3.

    [13] Smerdon, above n 4.

    [14] Primrose, above n 1, 2.

    [15] Vaughan-Williams, above n 12.

    [16] Primrose, above n 1, 6.

    [17] YWCA, About (2017) YWCA Merger .

    [18] YWCA, News & Media (2017) YWCA Merger .


  • 22 Nov 2017 10:47 AM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    COBA today announced the appointment of Michael Lawrence as its new CEO.

    Mr Lawrence brings 30 years’ experience in financial services to the role.

    He led AMP Bank as Managing Director from 2007 to 2015 and also worked at NAB in a range of roles in Australia and overseas, as well as time at Westpac.

    During his tenure as Managing Director of AMP Bank he took profit from $9m to $104m, with return on capital increasing from 6% to 16% and cost to income ratio down from 78% to 31% over the same period.

    “The Board warmly welcomes Michael and looks forward to the pivotal role he will play representing customer owned banking,” COBA Chair Wendy Machin said.

    “Michael’s strong background and experience as a leader will enable him to immediately take up a busy advocacy agenda.

    “Michael has already shown a great understanding of the issues and opportunities for the sector."

    Commenting on his appointment Mr Lawrence said:

    “I am delighted to join COBA as its new CEO.

    “The customer owned banking sector has a great deal to be proud of, particularly with its strong customer and community focus.

    “I look forward to advocating strongly for the sector and ensuring it continues to have a vibrant and strong future.

    “Customer owned banking already delivers terrific outcomes for millions of Australians. I’m very keen to help COBA members deliver on their exciting plans for growth in the future and within a competitive environment.”

    Michael Lawrence begins as COBA CEO on December 4.

    This article was originally sourced from Customer Owned Banking Association.


  • 22 Nov 2017 10:37 AM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    Six years after establishing The Funding Network in Australia and growing it to be one of the most respected collective giving models in Australia, CEO Lisa Cotton will step down in February 2018.

    “Under Lisa’s leadership, The Funding Network (TFN) has deeply impacted both the social and philanthropic sectors in Australia and we’re so proud of what this lean organisation has achieved,” TFN Chairman, Mark Osborn said.

    “Lisa has worked with a terrific team to build a strong community of corporate, philanthropic, and government partners who, along with nearly 5,000 individuals have come together to support more than 165 grassroots non-profit organisations both locally and abroad”.

    Since its inception TFN Australia has facilitated more than $6.8 million in funding, plus extensive in-kind support to grassroots non-profits working across a range of social issue areas.

    This year, TFN’s work has been widely recognised by our peers by being awarded the Anthill Smart 100 Innovations Award, and the Philanthropy Australia Small Grant of the Year. Lisa Cotton was included as one of ProBono Australia’s Impact 25 list of sector leaders and was named the Third Sector’s CEO of the Year.

    “Lisa’s vision and uncompromising commitment to getting TFN off the ground and flourishing has contributed to the growth of the broader philanthropic ecosystem,” Osborn said. “TFN’s ability to think big and move fast, and the team’s fundamental belief in human dignity has been central to our success.

    “Lisa is leaving TFN in an extremely strong position. Her view is that as TFN embarks on its next stage of growth and development, it’s a perfect time to bring a new leader on board”, he said.

    Lisa will be succeeded by Julie McDonald, currently CEO of The Kolling Foundation where she’s responsible for building and leading the performance of the foundation on behalf of Royal North Shore Hospital, Ryde Hospital and the Kolling Institute of Research. Prior to that, Julie was General Manager Fundraising and Communications for St Vincent de Paul Society.

    “I’m delighted to be handing over the reins to Julie early next year,” Lisa Cotton said. “Her passion and extensive social sector and corporate experience in management, fundraising and marketing, will underpin TFN’s vision to build the capacity of non-profit organisations by democratising giving and facilitating greater community engagement.”

    Established in 2013, The Funding Network (TFN) is a capacity building model for non-profit organisations that convenes live crowdfunding events and creates deeper donor connections into community via skilled volunteering, mentoring and learning forums. As a non-profit organisation, The Funding Network collaborates with a large community network of individuals, foundations, businesses and government bodies seeking to support innovative social change programs. To find out more visit www.thefundingnetwork.com.au

    This article was originally sourced from the Generosity Magazine.

  • 06 Nov 2017 3:58 PM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    The Board of Directors of the Australian Institute of Project Management today announced that CEO, Ms Yvonne Butler FAIPM, has advised that she will be stepping down from the position of Chief Executive Officer in December 2017.

    AIPM Chair of the Board, Mr Leh Simonelli, expressed the Board’s sentiment when he said “On behalf of the Board I would like to thank Yvonne for the significant contribution she made in her time as CEO to the Institute and to the profession of project management as a whole. Her passion, commitment and dedication will be sorely missed, and her efforts in setting the course of the Institute should be highly commended.”

    After over three years at the helm of Australia’s peak body for project management, Yvonne oversaw some of the most significant strategic changes and policy improvements in the history of the Institute. She drove the 2015-2020 strategic plan, as well as the new constitution as approved by members at the 2015 AGM in Hobart. Other key achievements included the addition of IPMA’s international certification, improvement of our local RegPM certification program, the 2016 AIPM Inaugural Regional conference in conjunction with IPMA and her outstanding advocacy work for the profession.

    Ms Butler will remain at the Institute until December, and was quoted as saying “I am extremely proud of what the AIPM has been able to achieve in my time here as CEO. Through the support of the Board and our members we have been able to make significant advancements for the Institute and the profession, and with the new strategy in place the time is right for me to stand down. I would like to thank the Board, staff and volunteers of the AIPM who have made my time here so rewarding and enjoyable”.

    It will be business as usual at the AIPM over the next three months, as Yvonne works closely with the Board and the Executive Team during the transition to effect a smooth handover and to ensure consistency of her legacy.

    The Institute would like to wish Yvonne all the very best in the next step of her career and thanks her for her significant contribution to the Institute and the profession of Project Management.

    This press release was sourced from Australian Institute of Project Management and was written by Michael Martin.


  • 03 Nov 2017 1:38 PM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    Six years after establishing The Funding Network in Australia and growing it to be one of the most respected collective giving models in Australia, CEO Lisa Cotton will step down in February 2018.

    “Under Lisa’s leadership, The Funding Network (TFN) has deeply impacted both the social and philanthropic sectors in Australia and we’re so proud of what this lean organisation has achieved,” TFN Chairman, Mark Osborn said.

    “Lisa has worked with a terrific team to build a strong community of corporate, philanthropic, and government partners who, along with nearly 5,000 individuals have come together to support more than 165 grassroots non-profit organisations both locally and abroad”.

    Since its inception TFN Australia has facilitated more than $6.8 million in funding, plus extensive in-kind support to grassroots non-profits working across a range of social issue areas.

    This year, TFN’s work has been widely recognised by our peers by being awarded the Anthill Smart 100 Innovations Award, and the Philanthropy Australia Small Grant of the Year. Lisa Cotton was included as one of ProBono Australia’s Impact 25 list of sector leaders and was named the Third Sector’s CEO of the Year.

    “Lisa’s vision and uncompromising commitment to getting TFN off the ground and flourishing has contributed to the growth of the broader philanthropic ecosystem,” Osborn said. “TFN’s ability to think big and move fast, and the team’s fundamental belief in human dignity has been central to our success.

    “Lisa is leaving TFN in an extremely strong position. Her view is that as TFN embarks on its next stage of growth and development, it’s a perfect time to bring a new leader on board”, he said.

    Lisa will be succeeded by Julie McDonald, currently CEO of The Kolling Foundation where she’s responsible for building and leading the performance of the foundation on behalf of Royal North Shore Hospital, Ryde Hospital and the Kolling Institute of Research. Prior to that, Julie was General Manager Fundraising and Communications for St Vincent de Paul Society.

    “I’m delighted to be handing over the reins to Julie early next year,” Lisa Cotton said. “Her passion and extensive social sector and corporate experience in management, fundraising and marketing, will underpin TFN’s vision to build the capacity of non-profit organisations by democratising giving and facilitating greater community engagement.”

    Established in 2013, The Funding Network (TFN) is a capacity building model for non-profit organisations that convenes live crowdfunding events and creates deeper donor connections into community via skilled volunteering, mentoring and learning forums. As a non-profit organisation, The Funding Network collaborates with a large community network of individuals, foundations, businesses and government bodies seeking to support innovative social change programs. To find out more visit www.thefundingnetwork.com.au

    This article was originally sourced from Generosity Magazine

  • 31 Oct 2017 7:16 AM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    The 2017-18 Not For Profit Remuneration Report is now available! The AuSAE member price is $231.00 instead of RRP of $286.00; a saving of $55.00 or 20%.

    To take up this opportunity on this special AuSAE member price, click here.

    Overview and Purpose

    What are you worth? Use Australia's leading and most comprehensive Not for Profit Remuneration Report. This Report offers valuable information on the remuneration of a comprehensive range of position LEVELS within the Australian Not for Profit sector. It covers CEOs, Board members, all senior managers and staff positions. It includes important benchmarking data from the most recent financial year, and tracks critical trends in remuneration levels for CEOs and senior positions over the last decade.

    Have the confidence that your remuneration decisions accurately reflect the latest information on Not for Profit sector remuneration in Australia.

    The report presents results for each position by:

    • total organisation expenditure;
    • benefits paid;
    • total number of employees;
    • number of employees reporting to the position;
    • number of paid members;
    • geographic scope;
    • headquarters location;
    • organisation classification;
    • incumbent's gender; and
    • length of time in position.

    Functions Covered (each with 3 staff Levels)

    • Board; 
    • Executive;
    • Accreditation / Certification;
    • Administration;
    • Business / Commercial Operations;
    • Cenre or Facility Operations;
    • Communications;
    • Conventions / Meetings / Exhibitions;
    • Education / Training;
    • Finance;
    • Fundraising;
    • Human Resources;
    • Information and Communications Systems;
    • Marketing;
    • Membership;
    • Policy / Government Relations / Advocacy;
    • Publications;
    • Specific Program or Service;
    • Technical / Research; and
    • Welfare and Community Development / Support. 

    We are very proud of the quality and breadth of details in the report; and are again confident in its value in the hands of those involved in the association and NFP sector generally.

    Click here to take up this special AuSAE member price.

  • 27 Oct 2017 1:28 PM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    Thank you for being a member this past year, the team at AuSAE hope we had the chance to meet you and demonstrate our passion for the Association industry and developing this further in Australia and New Zealand.

    We invite you to join us again in 2018 and continue to make a powerful investment in your career at the Australasian home for Association professionals.

    • Belong to community of like-minded professionals to compare experiences and hear success stories
    • Connect to great people and great ideas to expand your network
    • Advance your career, enhance your skills and professional development and stay up-to-date with industry trends
    • Be inspired and learn from industry leaders and Association peers

    We’re pleased to let you know our key milestones this year:

    • Increased our community of Association professionals by 16% adding 180 new members
    • In New Zealand we held 33 events including the annual LINC Conference and Exhibition
    • More than 427 people attended NZ Events
    • Piloted a new event series titled Women in Association Leadership in Australia
    • In Australia, we hosted 53 events including the ACE Conference and Exhibition
    • Welcomed more than 1,350 people at Australian events across 7 States & Territories
    • Repositioned and refreshed our brand identity to better represent the membership
    • Launched a new monthly e-newsletter Association Insights including member only content

    Our focus in 2018 will be to:

    • Expand our online education program
    • Increase our focus on developing practical resources and tools
    • Add new formats to our face-to-face events
    • Support the development of benchmarking reports, advice and knowledge centres
    • Investigate the introduction of an Association Manager Certification

    Thank you for your on-going support of the only not-for-profit organisation representing Association Professionals, together we can build the capability and capacity of Association Leaders and Membership organisations.

    Renew your AuSAE membership today!

    RENEW TODAY and call our team on 1800 764 576. We look forward to hearing from you. 

  • 27 Oct 2017 1:13 PM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    Mentors are truly magnificent people who share their time, energy and experience with someone else. They guide and encourage, they challenge and confront, but most of all they support and listen.

    My first real mentor was an ex-boss. He gave me my first job as a graduate and watched out for me as I progressed through the ranks of a multinational, eventually reaching the Marketing Director role that he was in when he employed me.

    Throughout the intervening fifteen years, he was a sounding board and provided a fresh perspective when I couldn’t see the wood from the trees. But most of all it was his belief in me, as an inexperienced young woman, straight out of university, that I most appreciated. His unwavering belief in my potential helped me gain confidence until I, too, believed in me.

    Many people I meet, say they have never had a mentor. If this is true, then they have truly missed out on something special. I suspect, though, that they actually have had people support and guide them, they just haven’t thought to us the label of ‘mentor’. Equally, I believe that there are people who may be thought of as a mentor by another, without ever realising the depth of impact that their words of encouragement or advice, might have had.

    On National Mentoring Day, it’s a great time to pause and reflect. Who have been, and are, the mentors in your life? What have they contributed and what was their legacy? Isn’t it time you acknowledged them or expressed your gratitude? Make their day with a thank you, big or small.

    And don’t underestimate your own capacity to touch someone’s life in a profound way. Is there someone you could provide mentorship to? There is almost nothing more rewarding than knowing you have truly helped someone reach their potential.

    Life is short, do it today!

    This article was sourced from Art of Mentoring.

  • 25 Oct 2017 11:27 AM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    Advanced Solutions International (ASI), a leading global provider of software and services for associations and not-for-profits, announced today that the 2017 release of its iMIS 20 Engagement Management System (EMS)™ is now available. iMIS 20 2017 helps organizations better connect with their members, donors, and other constituents — thereby deepening engagement, improving satisfaction, and increasing retention. Learn more at www.advsol.com/primis.

    With each new iMIS 20 release, ASI continues to extend its vision of the only Engagement Management System for the not-for-profit world that can eliminate data silos, improve reporting, and enable continuous performance improvement in a single cloud-based system. iMIS 20 2017 will help organizations increase operational efficiency, make better business decisions and advance their missions.

    The RiSE web development platform — the central nervous system of iMIS 20 — makes all of this possible by concentrating database management and web publishing into a single, easy-to-use application. With iMIS 20, an organization's website and business system can be one and the same.

    The iMIS 20 2017 release contains 150+ new features and enhancements, including:

    • Engagement scoring
    • Security and PCI improvements
    • 100+ new reports, queries and dashboards

    Learn more about iMIS 20 2017 at http://www.advsol.com/primis.

    About ASI

    Advanced Solutions International (ASI) is a recognized global, industry thought leader that focuses on helping associations and not-for-profits increase operational and financial performance through the use of best practices, proven solutions, and ongoing client advisement. Since 1991, ASI has served nearly 4,000 clients and millions of users worldwide, both directly and indirectly through a network of over 100 partners, and currently maintains corporate offices in the USA, UK, Canada, and Australia.

    See ASI at the AuSAE LINC Conference in Wellington 13/14 November. 

  • 24 Oct 2017 2:06 PM | Shayne Morris (Administrator)

    The Australian Custodial Services Association (ACSA), the peak body representing the custody industry in Australia, today announced the appointment of Mr Robert J. Brown as its chief executive officer.

    The appointment of Mr Brown represents a milestone for the organisation, and comes as the industry works through key issues including the Asia Fund Passport legislation and the blockchain replacement of ASX’s CHESS system.

    Mr Brown is a 30-year veteran of the financial services industry, working at senior levels of organisations such as HSBC Securities Services, National Australia Bank, Commonwealth Bank of Australia and State Street Australia.

    Commenting on Mr Brown’s appointment, ACSA Chair, Mr David Knights said: “After an exhaustive recruitment process, we are pleased to welcome Rob back to ACSA as CEO. He brings a wealth of experience in the custody and financial services sectors, together with a past contribution to ACSA itself. His knowledge and skills will serve ACSA well as our industry adapts to the strategic shifts underway in the financial services sector.

    “On behalf of the ACSA Board and the wider industry, we welcome Rob to the role and look forward to his leadership in driving the Australian custody industry forward,” Mr Knights said.

    Commenting on his appointment, Mr Brown said: “ACSA is a unique organisation that provides value to its members, and insight to broader stakeholders, in the interests of an efficient and vibrant securities servicing sector. I look forward to developing further dialogue with members, and ensuring that our organisation is fully aligned to opportunities. ACSA’s history of collaboration, and our member’s willingness to share deep technical knowledge, provides a powerful platform for the ongoing development for our organisation.”

    Mr Brown started in the new role on Monday 16 October 2017.

    This media release was sourced from ACSA and was written by Kurt Graham.

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